History teacher sheds light on government theories

Andy Kimball
Junior Editor

History teacher Martin Milstead has talked about conspiracy theories like the CIA killing President John F Kennedy and NASA filming the moon landing during various social studies classes. (Artwork by Mary Kimball)

History teacher Martin Milstead has talked about conspiracy theories like the CIA killing President John F Kennedy and NASA filming the moon landing during various social studies classes. (Artwork by Mary Kimball)

Social Studies teacher Martin Milstead has taught at the high school since 1993.

Milstead has taught Honors U.S. History, Comparative Politics, Intro to law, U.S. Government and Geography.

Milstead said, “Over the years I have had my leaders killed by assassins, none of them were brought to trial, none were ever tested, and it took a long time before I thought that maybe there might be more to (the assassinations).”

Milstead has talked about the assassinations of John Kennedy, Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr., during class.

Junior Matthew Cota said after an Honors U.S. History test, Milstead talked about the theory John Kennedy was killed by the CIA.

Junior Matthew Fuller said Milstead has talked about theories but “talks about facts and lets (students) think about (the theories) for themselves.”

About the JFK assassination, Milstead said, “The CIA was given (from) the government plausible deniability, so basically they were doing things with the minimum amount of involvement by the official government so that the government could say they didn’t know what (the CIA) was going to do. (The CIA) could take out anybody that they deemed was necessary for the protection of the country.”

Milstead added, “After the Bay of Pigs (invasion of Cuba in 1961) President Kennedy gave out national security directives, which would essentially break up the CIA. He fired the top three people at the CIA, then you couple that with, who could redirect the parade route, who could take away protection on the parade route, who could relocate the six policeman who should have been right next to the limousine (that Kennedy was in), but they were behind (the limousine) that is the first time that that has ever happened. And it makes you wonder.”

About why he shares information about the assassinations, Milstead said, “One of the things I want students to do is to think for themselves. I never say they have to believe what I say. I always want them to check the things out for themselves.”

Milstead said students are constantly being bombarded with information and “most of the information, that you are getting is people trying to get you to believe something one way or the other.”

Milstead added talking about theories is a good way to relate history to today’s current events.



Categories: Features

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